How do you make an electric generator that transforms 30 Mw of mechanical power into 150 kV electricity?

electric generator

How do you make an electric generator that transforms 30 Mw of mechanical power into 150 kV electricity?
Would the construction be the same for an AC/DC generator (what's the difference between the two?)?
On a side note, what's the difference between an electric generator and an electric motor? Thanks a lot.

Best answer:

Answer by billrussell42
You go to GE or Siemens and buy one. A 30 MW generator is huge. The voltage is irrelevant, it's the power that counts.

Most all large generators are AC, since that is easier, does not require commutators (always a problem) and the AC can be sent to a transformer to generate any voltage needed.

Generators generate electrical power from mechanical power, and motors do the opposite.

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One Response to How do you make an electric generator that transforms 30 Mw of mechanical power into 150 kV electricity?

  1. Skywave

    The opening Q. cannot be fully answered, since when mechanical energy is converted into electrical energy, the only conversion that takes place is the nature of that energy. You have specified 30 MW of mechanical power. This can be converted into electrical power – in this case, typically about 25 ~ 28 MW. The resultant voltage that this electrical power is produced at is dependent on the resultant current that flows at the stipulated voltage – and if we are talking about a.c. here, the power factor of the load.

    All electrical generators that convert mechanical energy into electrical energy use a form of rotating machinery: the production of alternating current at 3-phase is the most common; sometimes 6-phase is produced. The production of d.c. can also be produced by rotating machinery, but it far more power-efficient to produce it as a.c. (and this is usually 6-phase or 12-phase) then rectify it to d.c.

    Generators & motors; the key differences.
    Simply put, a ‘generator’ converts a non-electrical * power source into only electrical power. A (electrical) ‘motor’ converts only electrical power into only mechanical power.

    * So, nuclear, coal, steam, chemical, wind, tidal, gas are all included here.
    .

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